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22 Aug

United States Wars, News and Casualties

United States Wars, News and Casualties

Published on Jul 6, 2016

The conflict in Iraq followed years of tensions between President Saddam Hussein and the West, amid accusations that he was stockpiling weapons of mass destruction. Jim Reed looks at the timeline of events that led to the war, and how it played out, for the Victoria Derbyshire programme.

Khatla Ali Abdullah, 90, is embraced as she flees her home as Iraqi forces battle with Islamic State militants in western Mosul. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Khatla Ali Abdullah, 90, is embraced as she flees her home as Iraqi forces battle with Islamic State militants in western Mosul. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

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“I regret they got hurt,’ Bush,the former president and war criminal said of the veterans.”

To the War Criminal Bush – And to the thousands upon thousands of innocent civilians?

Never, ever forget that the War Criminals Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld etc. founded ISIS and today are proud of what they did and feel no regret.

‘It was the right decision’: Bush says he has ‘no regrets’ about invading Iraq and Afghanistan when asked how he feels when he sees wounded veterans

Since the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts began, at least 8,000 US and allied soldiers have died, according to CNN.

Tens of thousands of civilians are believed to have been killed in Afghanistan since 2001, according to the United Nations.

The civilian death toll in Iraq is estimated to be somewhere between 170,000 and 190,000, according to Iraq Body Count

The McGlynn

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War News

IRAQ BODY COUNT>>

Total Dollar Cost of War>>

Cost of War in Iraq>>

Cost of War in Afghanistan>>

Cost of Military Action Against ISIS>>

Cost of Pentagon Slush Fund>>

GUARD: Living in a void: life in Damascus after the exodus

During six years of civil war in Syria, novelist has watched wave after wave of friends and family flee his home city. But despite everything, he has decided to stay

My sister, whom I haven’t seen for more than two years, told me she was going to cross the sea in a rubber dinghy. She hung up, not wanting to hear what I thought. She merely said something profound and sentimental and entrusted her three children to my care in the event that she drowned. A few minutes later I tried to call the unfamiliar Turkish number back, but the phone had been turned off. Hundreds of images from our childhood flooded my memory. It’s not easy to say goodbye to half a century of your life and wait for someone you love to drown. My fingers and toes felt cold and my head empty, and I didn’t feel able to argue anyway. What can one offer a woman who has lost her home and everything she owns and, not wanting to lose her children too, carried them off into exile to seek a safe haven in Turkey? Things are not easy for a woman like her there. She looks like millions of other Syrian women and does not have any special skills. All that’s left is the hope of asylum, even if it requires crossing the sea in a rubber dinghy. It’s as if she’s trying to tell me something I know already – that the sea is Syrians’ only hope.

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AP: Dozens killed in airstrikes on Syrian city of Raqqa

BEIRUT (AP) — Syrian state media and opposition activists are reporting that airstrikes on the northern city of Raqqa have killed dozens of civilians.

U.S.-backed Syrian opposition fighters have been trying to capture the city from the Islamic State group since June 6, and have been marching under the cover of airstrikes by the U.S.-led coalition.

The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces now holds more than half of Raqqa, the de facto capital of IS.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said on Tuesday that airstrikes on Raqqa the day before killed 42 civilians including 19 children and 12 women.

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REU: Russia hails progress in Syria conflict, ups bombing runs

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia on Monday hailed what it said was “a dramatic shift” in the Syria conflict, saying that the Syrian army, with Moscow’s help, was well on its way to pushing militants out of the central part of the country.

In a statement from the Russian Defence Ministry, Colonel-General Sergei Rudskoi said that the province of Aleppo had been entirely “liberated” with control of 50 population centers and more than 2,700 square kilometers (1042.48 square miles) of territory taken back.

“In the last month a dramatic shift has taken place in Syria,” said Rudskoi. “With the support of the Russian air force, Syrian forces have notched up a series of significant successes and won a major defeat over a big group of Islamic State fighters in the central part of Syria.”

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AP: Mattis: IS militants caught in Iraq-Syria military vise

BAGHDAD (AP) — Expelled from their main stronghold in northern Iraq, Islamic State militants are now trapped in a military vise that will squeeze them on both sides of the Syria-Iraq border, U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said.

Mattis arrived in the Iraqi capital on an unannounced visit Tuesday just hours after President Donald Trump outlined a fresh approach to the stalemated war in Afghanistan. Trump also has vowed to take a more aggressive, effective approach against IS in Iraq and Syria, but he has yet to unveil a strategy for that conflict that differs greatly from his predecessor’s.

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AP: Commander: Iraqi troops reach first urban areas of Tal Afar

BAGHDAD (AP) — A military commander says Iraqi troops have reached the first urban areas of the Islamic State-held northern town of Tal Afar.

Lt. Gen. Abdul-Amir Rasheed Yar Allah, who commands the operation, says in a statement on Tuesday that the special forces troops on Tuesday entered the al-Kifah neighborhood on the southwest edge of town. Yar Allah didn’t give more details.

Brig. Gen. Haider Fadhil, of the Iraqi special forces, told The Associated Press that IS fighters fired rockets, sent suicide car bombers and used roadside bombs.

The operation was launched Sunday, a month after Iraq declared victory over IS in Mosul, the country’s second largest city. Tal Afar, about 150 kilometers (93 miles) east of the Syrian border, is in one of the last pockets of IS-held territory in Iraq.

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IraqiNews: Iraqi forces kill 25 IS militants on way to central Tal Afar

Tal Afar (IraqiNews.com) Iraqi forces and paramilitary troops killed 25 Islamic State militants moving towards the center of Tal Afar, the group’s last entrenchment in Nineveh province.

Aljournal News website said the Interior Ministry’s Rapid Response Forces killed 15 IS members and detonated 12 explosive devices planted by the group in al-Kefah and Mulla Jassem regions, southwest of the town.

Meanwhile, the pro-government Popular Mobilization Forces said in a statement they killed ten militants in al-Khadraa district in the southeast, and detonated a booby-trapped vehicle driven by a suicide bomber before he attacked troops in the area.

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REU: U.S. defense secretary in Iraq as troops battle for Tal Afar

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis visited Iraq on Tuesday just days after the start of an offensive to oust Islamic State from the city of Tal Afar, with talks focused on backing Iraqi efforts to stabilize areas recaptured from the militant group.

Prior to arriving, Mattis said the fight against Islamic State was far from over despite recent successes by Western-backed Iraqi government forces. The battle for Tal Afar would be difficult, U.S. officials said.

Iraqi security forces opened the offensive to take back Tal Afar on Sunday, their latest objective in the war following the recapture of Mosul after a nine-month campaign that left much of the city in ruins.

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REU: Iraq must ensure Islamic State’s victims of sexual violence see justice: U.N.

ERBIL, Iraq (Reuters) – Iraq must ensure that women and girls subjected to sexual violence at the hands of Islamic State militants have access to justice and reparations, U.N. investigators said on Tuesday.

Thousands of people, predominantly from Iraq’s ethnic and religious minorities, have been subjected to sexual violence since Islamic State militants swept across vast swathes of Iraq in 2014. The report pays particular attention to members of the country’s Yazidi community, who were kidnapped and forcibly converted, enslaved or conscripted to fight for the militants.

“Women and girls under the control of ISIL, in particular women from the Yazidi and other minority communities, have been especially vulnerable to abuses of human rights and violation of international humanitarian law,” the report by the U.N. Assistance Mission to Iraq and the U.N. Human Rights Office said.

More than 6,800 Yazidis were kidnapped by Islamic State. About 3,000 of them are still believed to be held captive.

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NYT: More Talks Likely on Kurdish Independence Vote, Negotiator Says

BAGHDAD/ERBIL, Iraq — Iraqi government officials may meet Kurdish representatives again next week to try to convince them to delay or cancel a plan to hold an independence referendum, a negotiator said.

A first round of talks, held last week in Baghdad, brought the two sides closer and a second round could be held next week in the Kurdish capital Erbil, Abdullah al-Zaidi, a member of the government negotiating team, told Reuters on Monday evening.

A Kurdish official, Mala Bakhtiar, on Saturday told Reuters the possibility of postponing a planned Sept. 25 referendum on independence could be considered in return for financial and political concessions from the central government in Baghdad.

The United States and other Western nations fear the vote could ignite a new conflict with Baghdad and possibly neighboring countries, diverting attention from the ongoing war against Islamic State (IS) militants in Iraq and Syria.

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NYT: America’s 16 Years in Afghanistan: From Triumph to Stalemate

WASHINGTON — Sixteen years of U.S. warfare in Afghanistan have left the insurgents as strong as ever and the nation’s future precarious. Facing a quagmire, President Donald Trump on Monday outlined his strategy for “victory” in a country that has historically snared great powers and defied easy solutions.

America’s longest-running war began well as U.S.-led forces quickly toppled the Taliban government and disrupted al-Qaida leaders who plotted the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks from Afghan soil. But the fighting never ended.

In recent years, security has gradually worsened as Taliban insurgents, enjoying sanctuary in Pakistan, have gained a foothold across the country. Afghanistan’s rampant heroin trade, official corruption and infighting among the nation’s elite have only compounded problems.

Trump is the third U.S. president to grapple with the Afghan challenge. A look at the phases of the U.S. involvement to date:

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President admits: ‘My original instinct was to pull out’ but says he has bowed to advice from officials, and claims he will take tougher line with Pakistan

Donald Trump has announced he will prolong the US military intervention in Afghanistan, which he once described as a “complete waste”, bowing to advice from his top officials to raise the stakes once more in the 16-year conflict.

In a televised address to troops at Fort Myer in Virginia, Trump said he was setting out a new strategy for Afghanistan and South Asia. But he did not say how many more troops he would send, how long they would stay, or what their ultimate objective was.

He said there would be more onus on the Afghan government to perform better, in civilian and military terms, and on the Pakistani government to cut support for militants who find a haven along the Afghan border. Trump warned that Islamabad would have “much to lose” if it did not comply.

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NYT: Analysis: Trump Promises Victory, but His Plan Is Murky

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is vowing to win what has seemed to be an unwinnable war.

A photo taken on 14 September, 2010, showing US army officers with the 101st Airborne Division pay their respects by the boots, gun, helmet and dog-tags of US army First Lieutenant Todd W. Weaver displayed during a memorial ceremony

More than 2,300 US soldiers have died in Afghanistan since 2001

How he plans to do so is still murky despite the months of internal deliberations that ultimately persuaded Trump to stick with a conflict he has long opposed…………………Instead, Trump projected an “I got this” bravado that has become a hallmark of his presidency.

“In the end, we will win,” he declared of America’s longest war…………….After Trump’s speech, one headline on the website read: “‘UNLIMITED WAR.” Another said: “What Does Victory in Afghanistan Look Like? Washington Doesn’t Know.”

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REU: Despite expected U.S. troop hike, no end in sight to Afghan war

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – While President Donald Trump opened the door on Monday to beefing up U.S. forces in Afghanistan, he provided few details on how sending more troops will hasten a conclusion to America’s longest war.

“There is no quick fix to this problem,” said Bill Roggio, an insurgency expert with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a Washington-based policy institute, speaking before Trump’s speech. “Things will continue looking bleak for some time.”

In his approximately 30-minute nationally televised address, Trump said he would “expand authority” for U.S. commanders to target militant networks that “sow violence and chaos throughout Afghanistan.”

That paves the way to an increase in the 8,400 U.S. troop level in Afghanistan and broader rules of engagement as part of his plan to end a military conflict that began in 2001, U.S. officials said.

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AP: Afghan reaction mixed on Trump’s tough-talking speech

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghans on Tuesday welcomed U.S. President Donald Trump’s harsh words for Pakistan in a speech outlining his strategy for the war-torn country that critics said offered little in the way of details and ruled out nation-building.

Abdullah Abdullah, Afghanistan’s second most powerful official behind the president, said in a news conference that the U.S. strategy marks a unique opportunity to ultimately achieve peaceful objectives in the region…………..But analysts in Pakistan warned that isolating Islamabad as the only culprit could increase the influence of regional players like Russia, China and even Iran.

Imtiaz Gul, executive director of the Islamabad-based Center for Research and Security Studies, said of Trump’s accusations: “This has been the same narrative for the last 15 years. He just upped the ante by being more belligerent or hostile.” Gul warned that the president’s words could drive a wedge deeper into a region that needs cooperation if it is to find a peaceful end to Afghanistan’s protracted conflict……….Waheed Muzhda, a political analyst in Kabul, expressed fear that Trump’s emphasis on a military victory seemed guaranteed to prolong the war and increase casualties.

“In the future we will witness a worsening of the war, more killing and more problems for the Afghan nation,” said Muzhda. “Mr. Trump only emphasized winning the war militarily, but if a military solution to the war could have been possible, this should have been achieved with presence of 150,000 troops.”

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Taliban leaders, fighters suffer casualties in US drone strike in Nangarhar

At least thirteen Taliban insurgents including two of their local leaders were killed or wounded during the airstrikes in eastern Nangarhar province of Afghanistan. The provincial police commandment in a statement said the airstrike was carried out by the US forces on Monday morning. The statement further added that unmanned aerial vehicles targeted the Taliban

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Taliban vows relentless fight as US unveils new strategy for Afghanistan

The Taliban group in Afghanistan reacted at the announcement of the new strategy of the United States by President Donald Trump, vowing relentless fight. Claiming that the country has been occupied by the foreign forces, the group in a statement said Washington was supposed to think about the withdrawal of its forces from Afghanistan rather

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Casualties, Exclusive of Civilians

Recent Casualties

Color Denotes Today’s Confirmation

The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Inherent Resolve. They died Aug. 13 of wounds sustained while engaged in combat operations in Iraq. Both soldiers were assigned to 2nd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The incident is under investigation.

Killed were:

Sgt. Roshain Euvince Brooks, 30, of Brooklyn, New York

Spc. Allen Levi Stigler Jr., 22, of Arlington, Texas

The Department of Defense announced today the death of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel. They died Aug. 2 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, as a result of injuries sustained when a vehicle-borne improved explosive device detonated near their convoy. Both soldiers were assigned to 2nd Battalion, 504th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C. The incident is under investigation.

Killed were:

Sgt. Jonathon Michael Hunter, 23, of Columbus, Indiana.

Spc. Christopher Michael Harris, 25, of Jackson Springs, North Carolina.

The Department of Defense announced today the death of an airman who was supporting Operation Inherent Resolve.

Tech. Sgt. David Board, 49, of Barboursville, West Virginia, died August 2 in Kuwait in a non-combat-related incident while deployed in support of combat operations.

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom Sentinel.

Pfc. Hansen B. Kirkpatrick, 19, of Wasilla, Alaska, died July 3, in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, from wounds received during an indirect fire attack. The incident is under investigation.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas.

DOD:  The Department of Defense announced today the death of three soldiers who were supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

They died June 10 in Peka Valley, Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, of gunshot wounds sustained in Peka Valley, Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan. The incident is under investigation.

The Soldiers were assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3rd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and Company D, 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, KY.

Killed were:

Sgt. Eric M. Houck, 25, of Baltimore, Maryland;

Sgt. William M. Bays, 29 of Barstow, California; and

Corporal Dillon C. Baldridge, 22 of Youngsville, North Carolina

 

Iraq Coalition Casualties: Military Fatalities By Name>>

Afghanistan Coalition Casualties: Military Fatalities By Name>>

PTSD: National Center for PTSDPTSD Care for Veterans, Military, and FamiliesSee Help for Veterans with PTSD to learn how to enroll for VA health care and get an assessment.All VA Medical Centers provide PTSD care, as well as many VA clinics.Some VA’s have programs specializing in PTSD treatment. Use the VA PTSD ProgramLocator to find a PTSD program.If you are a war Veteran, find a Vet Center to help with the transition from military to civilian life.Call the 24/7 Veteran Combat Call Center1-877-WAR-VETS (1-877-927-8387) to talk to another combat Veteran.DoD’s Defense Centers of Excellence (DCoE) 24/7 Outreach Center for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury provides information and helps locate resources.Call 1-866-966-1020 or email resources@dcoeoutreach.orgMilitary OneSourceCall 24/7 for counseling and many resources 1-800-342-9647.Need further assistance? Get Help with VA PTSD Care, Benefits, or Claims.

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