themcglynn.com

20 Jul

United States Wars, News and Casualties

United States Wars, News and Casualties

The dead & suffering children of Iraq.


Iraq Children by The McGlynn

Published 11 years ago

War News

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Inherent Resolve.

Sgt. William Edward Friese, 30, from Rockport, West Virginia, died July 18, 2019 in Camp Buehring, Kuwait, from a non-combat related incident. The incident is under investigation.

Friese was assigned to 821st Engineer Company, 1092nd, Engineer Battalion, 111th Engineer Brigade, Summersville, West Virginia.  

BBC: US to send troops to Saudi Arabia as tensions with Iran grow

The Pentagon has said US troops are being deployed to Saudi Arabia to defend American interests from “emergent credible threats”.

The move comes amid heightened tensions with Iran over the safety of shipping lanes in the Gulf.

Saudi Arabia confirmed that King Salman had approved the move “to strengthen regional security and stability”.

The kingdom has not hosted US forces since 2003 when they withdrew at the end of the war with Iraq.

The US presence in Saudi Arabia started with Operation Desert Storm in 1991, when Iraq invaded Kuwait.

BBC North America correspondent Peter Bowes says the US is understood to be deploying Patriot air defence missile batteries manned by 500 soldiers to Prince Sultan Base in Saudi Arabia.

The US also plans to send a squadron of F-22 stealth fighters to the base.

“This movement of forces provides an additional deterrent and ensures our ability to defend our forces and interests in the region from emergent, credible threats,” a statement from US Central Command said.

What’s the background?

Tensions between the US and Iran have worsened since Washington unilaterally withdrew from a landmark 2015 nuclear deal. The US has since tightened sanctions it re-imposed on Iran’s oil sector.

Last month, Iran shot down a US surveillance drone over the Strait of Hormuz, accusing it of violating Iranian airspace. The US insisted the drone had been over international waters at the time, and condemned it as an unprovoked attack.

The US has also called on Iran to release a Panamanian-flagged tanker and 12 of its crew, which was seized by Revolutionary Guards on Sunday during a naval patrol. Iran said the vessel had been smuggling fuel.

Then on Thursday President Donald Trump said a US warship had destroyed an Iranian drone that came too close. Iran has denied losing a drone.

Read Full Article>>

REU: Saudi king approves hosting U.S. troops to enhance regional security: SPA

RIYADH (Reuters) – Saudi Arabia’s King Salman approved hosting U.S. forces in the country to boost regional security and stability, the state news agency (SPA) reported on Friday.

The U.S. Defense Department confirmed the move in a statement, saying it would deploy troops and resources to Saudi Arabia to “provide an additional deterrent” in the face of “emergent, credible threats.”

The gesture comes amid rising tensions between Washington and Tehran in the Gulf that have impacted global oil markets. [O/R]

On Friday, Iran said it had seized a British oil tanker in the Strait of Hormuz, but denied Washington’s assertion that the U.S. Navy had downed an Iranian drone nearby earlier this week.

The decision on hosting U.S. forces aims “to increase joint cooperation in defence of regional security and stability and to preserve its peace” SPA said, quoting a Ministry of Defence official, without giving further details.

A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the deployment would include about 500 U.S. military personnel in Saudi Arabia, and is part of a boost in the number of U.S. troops in the Middle East that the Pentagon announced last month.

In June, the Pentagon said it would deploy 1,000 troops to the Middle East but did not say where they were going.

Relations between Washington and Tehran worsened last year when President Donald Trump abandoned a 2015 nuclear deal between world powers and Iran.

Under the pact, Iran agreed to restrict nuclear work, long seen by the West as a cover for developing nuclear weapons, in return for lifting sanctions. But sanctions have since been reimposed, badly hurting Iran’s economy.

Trump has said he considers Saudi Arabia an important partner in the Middle East and counterweight to the influence of Iran.

Reporting by Alaa Swilam and Marwa Rashad; Additional reporting by Idrees Ali in Washington; Writing by Makini Brice; Editing by Chris Reese, G Crosse and Leslie Adler

AP: Iraqi forces launch anti-IS operation north of Baghdad

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq’s military says its troops are partnering with security agencies and paramilitary forces to clear remnants of the Islamic State group north of Baghdad and surrounding areas.

The operation launched Saturday is the second phase of operation dubbed “Will to Victory.” The military said the new target area is north of Baghdad and Diyala, Salahuddin and Anbar provinces.

The first phase was launched two weeks ago, and targeted the area along the border with Syria.

Although Iraq declared victory against IS in July 2017, the extremists have turned into an insurgency and continue to carry out deadly attacks in the country.

The military said Iraqi troops, Iran-backed Popular Mobilization Forces, the federal police and others are taking part in the operation supported by the Iraqi and the U.S-led international coalition.

AP: Women, children among 10 dead in airstrikes in Afghanistan

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghan officials say at least 10 civilians have been killed in separate airstrikes by Afghan security forces in western Badghis province.

Ziauddin Akazai, a lawmaker from Badghis, says two other people were wounded in Friday night’s attacks in Bala Murghab district.

Abdul Aziz Beg, head of the provincial council, says insurgents have surrounded an army base in the district. He says choppers have been trying to reach the base, but insurgents are shooting from nearby villages and any return fire would endanger villagers.

Three children, two women and five men were among those killed in the attacks, said Beg.

The Taliban, who control roughly half of Afghanistan, posted photos of dead children on their Twitter account saying that civilians killed by the air strikes in Badghis province.

AP: Explosion outside Kabul University kills 8, wounds 33

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A powerful bomb exploded outside the gates of Kabul University in the Afghan capital on Friday, killing at least eight people and wounding 33, according to police and health officials.

Several of the wounded were in critical condition, they said.

No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack, the latest to target Kabul. Both the Taliban and the Islamic State group often stage large-scale bombings in the city. The Taliban generally target Afghan forces and government officials and the Islamic State also often attacks minority Shiites.

The early morning blast also set two vehicles ablaze although it wasn’t clear if the attack was carried out by a suicide bomber or a remotely detonated bomb, said Kabul police spokesman Ferdous Faramarz.

The casualty tolls were released by the Health Ministry spokesman, Dr. Wahidullah Mayar, who tweeted: “All the wounded patients were evacuated to our hospitals and have been receiving the required treatment.”

After initial reports of six dead, Mayer said two people died of their wounds and that the number of wounded rose to 33, following reports from hospitals around the city.

The university compound houses several hostels where many students stay over the summer, attending classes and working on research projects. The university is co-ed and has women attending classes alongside men, something the Taliban oppose, saying they accept education for women but that it should be segregated.

Though Friday is the start of the weekend in Afghanistan, Massoud, an economics professor at the university who like many Afghans uses only one name, said that several lawyers were taking their exams to become judges when the explosion occurred.

It wasn’t immediately clear if the lawyers were the target. In recent months, at least two professors at Kabul University with alleged links to Afghanistan’s Islamic State affiliate have been arrested, and last year the wall that surrounds the university was emblazoned with graffiti reading, “Long Live Daesh,” the Arabic name for the Islamic State group.

A U.S. Department of Defense intelligence official told The Associated Press that the IS affiliate has stepped up efforts to recruit students from Kabul’s universities, particularly those who are tech savvy, to expand the group’s strength and reach. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to talk to the media.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said he was not aware of any Taliban involvement in Friday’s attack.

Bush’s Five Big Lies That Led to the Iraq Quagmire

These are the five lies Bush told that Ralph Nader documented to impeach him.

  • Weapons of Mass Destruction. The weapons have still not been found. Nader emphasized, “Until the 1991 Gulf War, Saddam Hussein was our government’s anti-communist ally in the Middle East. We also used him to keep Iran at bay. In so doing, in the 1980s under Reagan and the first Bush, corporations were licensed by the Department of Commerce to export the materials for chemical and biological weapons that President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney later accused him of having.” Those weapons were destroyed after the Gulf War. George W. Bush’s favorite chief weapons inspector, David Kay, after returning from Iraq and leading a large team of inspectors and spending nearly half a billion dollars told the president We were wrong. See: David Kay testimony before Senate Armed Services Committee, 2004-01-28.Tyler Drumheller, the former chief of the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) ’s Europe division, revealed that in the fall of 2002, George W. Bush, Vice President Cheney, then-National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice and others were told by CIA Director George Tenet that Iraq’s foreign minister — who agreed to act as a spy for the United States — had reported that Iraq had no active weapons of mass destruction program.

  • Iraq Ties to Al Qaeda. The White House made this claim even though the CIA and FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) repeatedly told the Administration that there was no tie between Saddam Hussein and Al Qaeda. They were mortal enemies — one secular, the other fundamentalist.

  • Saddam Hussein was a Threat to the United States. In fact, Saddam was a tottering dictator, with an antiquated, fractured army of low morale and with Kurdish enemies in Northern Iraq and Shiite adversaries in the South of Iraq. He did not even control the air space over most of Iraq.

  • Saddam Hussein was a Threat to his Neighbors. In fact, Iraq was surrounded by countries with far superior military forces. Turkey, Iran and Israel were all capable of obliterating any aggressive move by the Iraqi dictator.

  • The Liberation of the Iraqi People. There are brutal dictators throughout the world, many supported over the years by Washington, whose people need liberation from their leaders. This is not a persuasive argument since for Iraq, it’s about oil. In fact, the occupation of Iraq by the United States is a magnet for increasing violence, anarchy and insurrection

Leading To War – The Complete Film

Damn The War Criminals,

Bush,Cheney,Rice,Rumsfeld,Wolfowitz, Powell and Blair from England

Recent Casualties:

Color Denotes Today’s Confirmation

DOD Identifies Army Casualty

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Inherent Resolve.

Sgt. William Edward Friese, 30, from Rockport, West Virginia, died July 18, 2019 in Camp Buehring, Kuwait, from a non-combat related incident. The incident is under investigation.

Friese was assigned to 821st Engineer Company, 1092nd, Engineer Battalion, 111th Engineer Brigade, Summersville, West Virginia.  

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Sgt. Maj. James G. Sartor, 40, of Teague, Texas, died July 13, 2019, in Faryab Province, Afghanistan, as a result of injuries sustained from enemy small arms fire during combat operations. This incident is under investigation.

Sartor was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Sgt. 1st Class. Elliott J. Robbins, 31, from Ogden, Utah, died June 30, 2019, in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, from a non-combat related incident. The incident is under investigation.

Robbins was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.

The Department of Defense announced today the deaths of two soldiers who were supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Both soldiers died June 25, 2019, in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan as a result of wounds sustained from small arms fire while engaged in combat operations. The incident is under investigation.

The deceased are:

Master Sgt. Micheal B. Riley, 32, of Heilbronn, Germany. Riley was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.

Sgt. James G. Johnston, 24, of Trumansburg, New York. Johnston was assigned to 79th Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), 71st Ordnance Group, Fort Hood, Texas.

War Casualties By Name

Save The Children Organization

Save the Children is the world’s leading independent organisation for children and has been working with families, communities and local authorities in Iraq since 1991, leading NGOs in general relief and development programs.Save the Children is currently responding to the needs of internally displaced persons (IDP) and the Syrian refugees in Iraq, in camps and non-camp settings. Our goal is for children in Iraq to be supported in raising their voices and attaining their rights, especially the right to participate in decisions affecting their lives. They should have access to quality education, health and protection services. We are increasing access to community based services that protect, educate and improve quality of life for children. We are ensuring that there is an increased participation of boys and girls in age appropriate activities and services. We are ensuring that children benefit from government actions that create an environment of awareness and accountability to uphold child rights. We are also developing new resources and innovative practices that support our work for children and youth.In Iraq, Save the Children’s interventions include Child Protection, Education, Food Security and Livelihoods, Shelter and Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), reaching vulnerble children and families in northern and central Iraq. Save the Children’s programs are implemented through field offices in Erbil, Dohuk, Sulaymaniyah, Kirkuk and Kalar, with a country office located in Erbil.

Visit Save The Children Organization>>

Iraqi War Children

Please Never Forget.

Comments are closed.

© 2020 themcglynn.com | Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS)

Global Positioning System Gazettewordpress logo