themcglynn.com

29 Mar

United States Wars, News and Casualties

United States Wars, News and Casualties

War News

NYT: Stuck in a Syria Tent Camp, the Women and Children of ISIS Wait

Women and children who fled the Islamic State’s last areas of control in Syria, at Al Hol camp.CreditCreditIvor Prickett for The New York Times

AL HOL CAMP, Syria — She left the Netherlands to join the Islamic State in Syria, and married a fighter here. He was killed, so she married another, who got her pregnant before he was killed, too.

Then this month, as the Islamic State collapsed, she surrendered with her son to United States-backed forces battling the jihadists and landed in the sprawling Al Hol tent camp, which has swollen to the breaking point with the human remnants of the so-called caliphate.

“I just want to go back to a normal life,” said Jeanetta Yahani, 34, as her son Ahmed, 3, clung to her leg and shook with a violent cough.

The announcement a week ago that the Islamic State had lost its final patch of territory in Syria was a milestone in the battle against the world’s most fearsome terrorist network. But it also raised urgent questions about the tens of thousands of people who flocked to join the jihadists from around the world and now have nowhere else to go.

Untold numbers of the more than 12 million people who lived under the Islamic State’s control in Iraq and Syria were killed by the militants or in the battle against them. Camps holding some who survived dot Iraq, Libya and Syria, where the Kurdish-led administration in the country’s northeast runs three.

“There is little support, little response,” said Mohammed Bashir, a camp administrator.

This week, local officials called for the creation of an international court to try foreign fighters, but the idea has garnered little international support and the Syrian government would probably block it.

While determining the exact backgrounds of the women and children in the camps is difficult since many lack identification and use fake names, they are generally considered less dangerous than the men. But some were also combatants. And some still endorse the extremists’ ideology, making local officials reluctant to let them leave.

More than 9,000 of the former ISIS residents in the camp are foreigners who are kept in a special section.CreditIvor Prickett for The New York Times

Al Hol is the largest of the camps, a sprawling, isolated conglomeration of tents on rocky soil and surrounded by chain-link fencing and armed guards. It held about 9,000 people as of December, but as the Islamic State’s final territories fell, tens of thousands of people streamed out of those areas. Most were brought to Al Hol, swelling its population to more than 72,000 today.

As the population rose, camp workers scrambled to put up enough tents to house them, crowding families together to protect them from an unseasonably cold and rainy winter. But many young children have fallen ill and some have died. This week, camp residents revolted, shattering windows in the administration building before guards fired into the air to subdue them.

More than 9,000 of Al Hol’s residents are foreigners who are kept in a special section, to which The New York Times was granted rare access on Thursday.

Although defeated, women in the camp still follow the rules of the Islamic State, wearing black gowns and face veils with slits for their eyes. Their clothes were dirty, the hems and shoes caked with mud. Many toted toddlers with hacking coughs and runny noses. Other children sold cookies and soda their relatives had managed to bring in or stood in long lines for food, drinking water and gas for generators.

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AP: US-led coalition: 1,257 civilians killed in anti-IS strikes

 The elimination of the last Islamic State stronghold in Baghouz brings to a close a grueling final battle that stretched across several weeks and saw thousands of people flee the territory and surrender in desperation, and hundreds killed. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

BEIRUT (AP) — The U.S.-led coalition says more than 1,250 civilians were killed in 34,038 airstrikes against the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria during a more than four-year period.

The coalition in a statement Thursday released the civilian death toll from the period between when the aerial campaign began in August 2014 until February this year.

It comes just days after the U.S.-backed Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces announced it defeated IS in the last area it held in Syria in the village of Baghouz near the Iraqi border.

The coalition’s statement says: “We continue to employ thorough and deliberate targeting and strike processes to minimize the impact of our operations on civilian populations and infrastructure.”

It said the death toll was based on information available to the coalition.

GUARD: War has broken Yemen. A new route to peace is needed, now

The UN needs to understand Yemen better. Its peace process so far has been too simplistic and short-term

Girl holds a rifle in front of women loyal to the Houthi movement in Sana'a

‘The peace process is currently at a deadlock while the war is deepening grievances, ripping the social fabric and shattering an already fragile state.’ Photograph: Khaled Abdullah/Reuters

Yemen has long faced structural, economic, social and security challenges. The war that started in 2015 has only exacerbated Yemen’s many previous woes. The conflict, gradually escalating from a political impasse into full-scale hostilities, is quickly becoming intractable.

The war, which entered its fifth year this week, with an exceedingly complex political and military situation, is being worsened by an overwhelming humanitarian crisis that keeps growing in scale where almost 80% of the population is in need of aid. The peace process is currently at a deadlock while the war is deepening grievances, ripping the social fabric and shattering an already fragile state

Multiple factions are entangled in Yemen’s war: pro-government forces led by the president, Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi, are backed by a Saudi-led regional coalition, and are facing anti-government forces led by the Houthis. A third camp seeking to re-establish an independent southern state is currently locked in an uneasy marriage of convenience with the pro-government side. The infighting and the Saudi-led military intervention has resulted in thousands of civilian deaths, with estimates varying from 10,000 at very least, to 60,000. It has got so bad that children are dying from malnutrition and disease – according to UN, a child dies every 10 minutes because of lack of basic medical attention.

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REU: Germany extends Saudi arms sale ban for another six months

BERLIN (Reuters) – The German government said on Thursday it would extend for a further six months a ban on exporting arms to Saudi Arabia which has strained ties with fellow European arms exporters with whom German companies have joint programs.

The ban, imposed after the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, has been criticized by European allies since it put a question mark over billions of euros of military orders, including a 10 billion pound ($13.27 billion) deal to sell 48 Eurofighter Typhoon jets to Riyadh that would be led by Britain’s BAE Systems.

The freeze has pitted Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives against their Social Democrat coalition partners, who are keen to woo traditional voters skeptical about arms sales and worried about Saudi involvement in Yemen’s war.

“The ban will be extended for a further six months to September 30,” read an e-mailed statement by government spokesman Steffen Seibert. “Over this period no new export applications will be approved.”

But in an attempt to assuage French and British partners’ concerns, the government also agreed to extend for nine months export licences that had already been granted, provided the companies undertook not to deliver any finished weapon systems until the end of the year.

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AP: Afghan officials: Taliban attacks target police, killing 17

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghan officials say the latest Taliban attacks have killed 17 policemen across the country.

Nik Mohammad Nazari, spokesman in northern Badakhshan province, says three policemen were killed on Friday in the district of Arghanj Khowa, where fighting is still underway.

Provincial police chief Ghulam Daoud Tarakhil says the Taliban launched massive attacks in eastern Ghazni province, targeting two checkpoints on Thursday and killing nine policemen. Tarakhil says the Taliban were “defeated with heavy causalities” after hours of gunbattles.

Deputy provincial council chief Asadullah Kakar says five policemen were killed in southeastern Zabul province’s district of Shinkay on Thursday.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for all three attacks.

Separately, governor spokesman Asadullah Dawlatzai says a mortar struck a house in eastern Laghman province on Thursday, killing two, including a child.

Damn The War Criminals,

Bush,Cheney,Rice,Rumsfeld,Wolfowitz, Powell and Blair from England

Bush’s Five Big Lies That Led to the Iraq Quagmire

These are the five lies Bush told that Ralph Nader documented to impeach him.

  • Weapons of Mass Destruction. The weapons have still not been found. Nader emphasized, “Until the 1991 Gulf War, Saddam Hussein was our government’s anti-communist ally in the Middle East. We also used him to keep Iran at bay. In so doing, in the 1980s under Reagan and the first Bush, corporations were licensed by the Department of Commerce to export the materials for chemical and biological weapons that President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney later accused him of having.” Those weapons were destroyed after the Gulf War. George W. Bush’s favorite chief weapons inspector, David Kay, after returning from Iraq and leading a large team of inspectors and spending nearly half a billion dollars told the president We were wrong. See: David Kay testimony before Senate Armed Services Committee, 2004-01-28.Tyler Drumheller, the former chief of the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) ’s Europe division, revealed that in the fall of 2002, George W. Bush, Vice President Cheney, then-National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice and others were told by CIA Director George Tenet that Iraq’s foreign minister — who agreed to act as a spy for the United States — had reported that Iraq had no active weapons of mass destruction program.

  • Iraq Ties to Al Qaeda. The White House made this claim even though the CIA and FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) repeatedly told the Administration that there was no tie between Saddam Hussein and Al Qaeda. They were mortal enemies — one secular, the other fundamentalist.

  • Saddam Hussein was a Threat to the United States. In fact, Saddam was a tottering dictator, with an antiquated, fractured army of low morale and with Kurdish enemies in Northern Iraq and Shiite adversaries in the South of Iraq. He did not even control the air space over most of Iraq.

  • Saddam Hussein was a Threat to his Neighbors. In fact, Iraq was surrounded by countries with far superior military forces. Turkey, Iran and Israel were all capable of obliterating any aggressive move by the Iraqi dictator.

  • The Liberation of the Iraqi People. There are brutal dictators throughout the world, many supported over the years by Washington, whose people need liberation from their leaders. This is not a persuasive argument since for Iraq, it’s about oil. In fact, the occupation of Iraq by the United States is a magnet for increasing violence, anarchy and insurrection.

Civilian casualties in the war in Afghanistan (2001–present)

During the war in Afghanistan (2001–present), over 31,000 civilian deaths due to war-related violence have been documented;[1][2] 29,900 civilians have been wounded.[2] Over 111,000 Afghans, including civilians, soldiers and militants, are estimated to have been killed in the conflict.[1] The Cost of War project estimated that the number who have died through indirect causes related to the war may be as high 360,000 additional people based on a ratio of indirect to direct deaths in contemporary conflicts.[3] These numbers do not include those who have died in Pakistan.

The war, launched by the United States as “Operation Enduring Freedom” in 2001, began with an initial air campaign that almost immediately prompted concerns over the number of Afghan civilians being killed[4] as well as international protests. With civilian deaths from airstrikes rising again in recent years,[5] the number of Afghan civilians being killed by foreign military operations has led to mounting tension between the foreign countries and the government of Afghanistan. In May 2007, President Hamid Karzai summoned foreign military commanders to warn them of the consequences of further Afghan civilian deaths.[6] The civilian losses are a continuation of the extremely high civilian losses experienced during the Soviet–Afghan War in the 1980s, and the three periods of civil war following it: 1989–1992, 1992–1996, and 1996–2001.

Casualties, Exclusive of Civilians

Recent Casualties:

Color Denotes Today’s Confirmation

The Pentagon has identified two U.S. soldiers killed in Afghanistan while involved in combat operations Friday in Kunduz Province.

The men were identified Saturday as Spc. Joseph P. Collette, 29, of Lancaster, Ohio, and Sgt. 1st Class Will D. Lindsay, 33, of Cortez, Colorado. Collette was assigned to the 242nd Ordnance Battalion, 71st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group, and Lindsay was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Both were based at Fort Carson, Colorado.

“The 71st Ordnance Group … is deeply saddened by the loss of Spc. Joseph P. Collette. We extend our deepest sympathies and condolences to his family and friends,” Col. David K. Green, commander of 71st Ordnance Group, said in a statement.

The fatalities bring to four the number of U.S. soldiers killed so far this year in Afghanistan. The deaths underscore the difficulties in bringing peace to the war-ravaged country.

Casualties, Exclusive of Civilians

Recent Casualties:

Color Denotes Today’s Confirmation

The Pentagon has identified two U.S. soldiers killed in Afghanistan while involved in combat operations Friday in Kunduz Province.

The men were identified Saturday as Spc. Joseph P. Collette, 29, of Lancaster, Ohio, and Sgt. 1st Class Will D. Lindsay, 33, of Cortez, Colorado. Collette was assigned to the 242nd Ordnance Battalion, 71st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group, and Lindsay was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Both were based at Fort Carson, Colorado.

“The 71st Ordnance Group … is deeply saddened by the loss of Spc. Joseph P. Collette. We extend our deepest sympathies and condolences to his family and friends,” Col. David K. Green, commander of 71st Ordnance Group, said in a statement.

The fatalities bring to four the number of U.S. soldiers killed so far this year in Afghanistan. The deaths underscore the difficulties in bringing peace to the war-ravaged country.

Cost of War in Iraq>>

Cost of War in Afghanistan>>

Care for Veterans:

PTSD: National Center for PTSDPTSD Care for Veterans, Military, and FamiliesSee Help for Veterans with PTSD to learn how to enroll for VA health care and get an assessment.All VA Medical Centers provide PTSD care, as well as many VA clinics.Some VA’s have programs specializing in PTSD treatment. Use the VA PTSD Program Locator to find a PTSD program.If you are a war Veteran, find a Vet Center to help with the transition from military to civilian life.Call the 24/7 Veteran Combat Call Center1-877-WAR-VETS (1-877-927-8387) to talk to another combat Veteran.DoD’s Defense Centers of Excellence (DCoE) 24/7 Outreach Center for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury provides information and helps locate resources.Call 1-866-966-1020 or email resources@dcoeoutreach.orgMilitary OneSourceCall 24/7 for counseling and many resources 1-800-342-9647.Need further assistance? Get Help with VA PTSD Care

Save The Children Organization

Save the Children is the world’s leading independent organisation for children and has been working with families, communities and local authorities in Iraq since 1991, leading NGOs in general relief and development programs.Save the Children is currently responding to the needs of internally displaced persons (IDP) and the Syrian refugees in Iraq, in camps and non-camp settings. Our goal is for children in Iraq to be supported in raising their voices and attaining their rights, especially the right to participate in decisions affecting their lives. They should have access to quality education, health and protection services. We are increasing access to community based services that protect, educate and improve quality of life for children. We are ensuring that there is an increased participation of boys and girls in age appropriate activities and services. We are ensuring that children benefit from government actions that create an environment of awareness and accountability to uphold child rights. We are also developing new resources and innovative practices that support our work for children and youth.In Iraq, Save the Children’s interventions include Child Protection, Education, Food Security and Livelihoods, Shelter and Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), reaching vulnerble children and families in northern and central Iraq. Save the Children’s programs are implemented through field offices in Erbil, Dohuk, Sulaymaniyah, Kirkuk and Kalar, with a country office located in Erbil.

Visit Save The Children Organization>>

 

Yemen War Child

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