themcglynn.com

25 Jan

United States Wars, News and Casualties

United States Wars, News and Casualties

Damn The War Criminals,

Bush,Cheney,Rice,Rumsfeld,Wolfowitz, Powell and Blair from England.

 

Afghan War Children

The war ended for those children, but it has never ended for survivors who carry memories of them. Likewise, the effects of the U.S. bombings continue, immeasurably and indefensibly.

Civilian casualties in the war in Afghanistan (2001–present)

During the war in Afghanistan (2001–present), over 31,000 civilian deaths due to war-related violence have been documented;[1][2] 29,900 civilians have been wounded.[2] Over 111,000 Afghans, including civilians, soldiers and militants, are estimated to have been killed in the conflict.[1] The Cost of War project estimated that the number who have died through indirect causes related to the war may be as high 360,000 additional people based on a ratio of indirect to direct deaths in contemporary conflicts.[3] These numbers do not include those who have died in Pakistan.

The war, launched by the United States as “Operation Enduring Freedom” in 2001, began with an initial air campaign that almost immediately prompted concerns over the number of Afghan civilians being killed[4] as well as international protests. With civilian deaths from airstrikes rising again in recent years,[5] the number of Afghan civilians being killed by foreign military operations has led to mounting tension between the foreign countries and the government of Afghanistan. In May 2007, President Hamid Karzai summoned foreign military commanders to warn them of the consequences of further Afghan civilian deaths.[6] The civilian losses are a continuation of the extremely high civilian losses experienced during the Soviet–Afghan War in the 1980s, and the three periods of civil war following it: 1989–1992, 1992–1996, and 1996–2001.

The McGlynn

War News

REU: U.S.-backed forces about to end Islamic State’s last enclave in Syria

BEIRUT (Reuters) – U.S.-backed, Kurdish-led forces are on the verge of eliminating Islamic State militants’ last remaining enclave in Syria near the border with Iraq after a four-month devastating bombing campaign that has left hundreds of civilian casualties, residents and rebels said on Wednesday.

The capture of the village of Baghous comes after a string of other villages fell in recent days to the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), a Kurdish-led militia alliance with aerial bombing strikes by the U.S.-led coalition.

The SDF, who launched a major offensive last September to remove the militants from their last pocket, were at first bogged down by fierce resistance, but advanced last month when they finally took the town of Hajin, the main urban stronghold in the enclave.

The SDF has now only a seven-kilometer stretch that separates them from full control of the entire east of the Euphrates River region, former residents and insurgents from the area say…………………….Resistance by an estimated several thousand militants fighting to the end collapsed after weeks of aerial bombing of the area that left many of the towns and villages in their hands on the banks of the Euphrates in ruins.

Residents and local activists have accused the U.S.-led coalition of indiscriminate bombing that they blame for killing dozens of civilians since the start of the campaign. The Pentagon says it is careful to avoid civilian casualties in its bombing raids and investigates any allegations.

Read Full Article>>

BBC: Woman becomes face of Iran protests despite not being there

For the past week Iran has been gripped by protests. Thousands of Iranians have taken to the streets to demonstrate against government corruption, unemployment and the weak economy.

Despite heavy restrictions on social media, some videos and pictures have found their way online, including those appearing to show protesters vandalising buildings and being fired at by government forces.

The authorities blocked access to Instagram and the messaging app Telegram in an attempt to stop calls for protests and the sharing of videos and photographs online, but then many images had already been circulated.

One of the most widely shared images is of a woman taking off her white head covering and waving it on a stick in an apparent act of defiance against Islamic rule. Although the image is genuine, it was not taken during the current unrest.

Read Full Article>>

GUARD: Iran arrested 7,000 dissidents in ‘year of shame’, says Amnesty

Journalists, lawyers, minority rights activists and anti-hijab protesters among those held

Iranian authorities arrested more than 7,000 dissidents last year in a sweeping crackdown that led to hundreds being jailed or flogged, at least 26 protesters being killed, and nine people dying in custody amid suspicious circumstances, according to Amnesty International.

Those rounded up during violent dispersals of peaceful protests in what Amnesty called “a year of shame for Iran” included journalists, lawyers, minority rights activists and women who protested against being forced to wear headscarves.

Iranian authorities beat unarmed protesters and used live ammunition, teargas and water cannon throughout the year – particularly in January, July and August – with thousands arbitrarily arrested and detained, new figures assert.

“2018 will go down in history as a year of shame for Iran,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Middle East research and advocacy director. “The staggering scale of arrests, imprisonments and flogging sentences reveal the extreme lengths the authorities have gone to in order to suppress peaceful dissent.

“From underpaid teachers to factory workers struggling to feed their families, those who have dared to demand their rights in Iran today have paid a heavy price. Throughout 2018, the Iranian authorities waged a particularly sinister crackdown against women’s rights defenders. Governments which are engaged in dialogue with Iran must not stay silent while the net of repression rapidly widens.”

Read Full Article>>

REU: Rights groups, British MPs call for access to Saudi detainees

RIYADH (Reuters) – Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch on Friday called on Saudi Arabia to allow independent monitors to meet detainees, including women’s rights activists who were allegedly tortured and prominent figures held in an anti-corruption campaign.

A group of British lawmakers threatened to publish their own report detailing allegations of mistreatment unless Riyadh grants them access to the women detainees by next week, British media reported a day earlier.

International scrutiny of Saudi Arabia’s human rights record and its role in the Yemen war has intensified in the wake of the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the kingdom’s Istanbul consulate last October.

The U.N. special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions told Reuters on Thursday she would travel to Turkey next week to head an “independent international inquiry” into the murder.

Read Full Article>>

REU: U.S. sanctions hit Iran-backed airlines, fighters in Syria

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States on Thursday targeted two Iran-backed foreign fighter militias in Syria and two airlines that help send weapons to Syria in fresh sanctions as Washington prepares for a military withdrawal from the war-torn country.

All four groups are linked to Iran’s Mahan Air and Iran’s elite military unit, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Quds Force, both of which are already blacklisted, the U.S. Treasury Department said in a statement.

The Fatemiyoun Division and Zaynabiyoun Brigade are being designated for providing material support to the IRGC-QF, the statement said.

“Treasury’s targeting of Iran-backed militias and other foreign proxies is part of our ongoing pressure campaign to shut down the illicit networks the regime uses to export terrorism and unrest across the globe,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement.

Since President Donald Trump announced that Washington will withdraw its roughly 2,000 troops in Syria, the administration has tried to allay concerns that Islamic State militants could stage a comeback in the region, or that Iran and Russia will benefit from the U.S. departure.

The United States imposed sanctions on Mahan Air in 2011, saying it provided financial and other support to Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards.

Read Full Article>>

AP: Taliban bring top leader into talks with US

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A co-founder of the Taliban who was released from prison in Pakistan in October has been appointed head of the group’s political office in Qatar as it negotiates with the United States over ending the 17-year-old Afghan war, the Taliban said Friday.

Abdul Ghani Baradar, a senior Taliban military commander, was arrested in Pakistan in 2010. His release is believed to have been arranged by the United States as part of the negotiations, and his presence could reassure battlefield commanders who may fear concessions by the political leadership.

Baradar was brought in to “strengthen and properly handle the ongoing negotiations process with the United States.” Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said. “Multiple changes have also taken place in the military and civilian departments” of the group, “so that the ongoing jihadi process and political efforts can develop positively,” he added.

U.S. envoy Zalmay Khalilzad has met with the Taliban on a number of occasions in recent months in the latest bid to end America’s longest war. The U.S. invaded Afghanistan after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks to topple the Taliban, who were harboring Osama bin Laden and al-Qaida. The Taliban have staged a comeback in recent years and today hold sway over nearly half the country.

Khalilzad has been in Qatar, where the Taliban maintain a political office, since Monday. The U.S. State Department has neither denied nor confirmed previous meetings with the Taliban, but Khalilzad says he has met with all sides in the conflict.

Pakistan has long had influence over the Taliban, and the senior leadership of the group is widely believed to be based there. Mohammad Faisal, a spokesman for Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry, said it had “facilitated” the ongoing negotiations in Qatar and that Pakistani officials were attending the latest talks.

The Taliban have refused to meet with the Afghan government, which they view as a U.S. puppet. Earlier this week, a Taliban assault on a military base run by the intelligence service killed dozens of people.

Read Full Article>>

Casualties, Exclusive of Civilians

Recent Casualties:

Color Denotes Today’s Confirmation

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Staff Sgt. Joshua Z. Beale, 32, of Carrollton, Virginia, died Jan. 22, 2019, as a result of injuries sustained from enemy small arms fire during combat operations in Tarin Kowt, Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan.

Beale was assigned to 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

The Department of Defense announced today the deaths of one soldier, one sailor and one DOD civilian who were supporting Operation Inherent Resolve.

The deceased are:

Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Jonathan R. Farmer, 37, of Boynton Beach, Florida. Farmer was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

Navy Chief Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) Shannon M. Kent, 35, of upstate New York. Kent was assigned to Cryptologic Warfare Activity 66, based at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.

DOD civilian Scott A. Wirtz of St. Louis, Missouri. Wirtz was assigned to the Defense Intelligence Agency as an operations support specialist.

Farmer, Kent and Wirtz died Jan. 16, 2019, in Manbij, Syria, as a result of wounds sustained from a suicide improvised explosive device.

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Sgt. Cameron A. Meddock, 26, of Spearman, Texas, died Jan. 17, 2019, in Landstuhl, Germany, as a result of injuries sustained from small arms fire during combat operations on Jan. 13, 2019, in Jawand District, Badghis Province, Afghanistan.

Meddock was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington.

Cost of War in Iraq>>

Cost of War in Afghanistan>>

Care for Veterans:

PTSD: National Center for PTSDPTSD Care for Veterans, Military, and FamiliesSee Help for Veterans with PTSD to learn how to enroll for VA health care and get an assessment.

All VA Medical Centers provide PTSD care, as well as many VA clinics.Some VA’s have programs specializing in PTSD treatment. Use the VA PTSD Program Locator to find a PTSD program.

If you are a war Veteran, find a Vet Center to help with the transition from military to civilian life.

Call the 24/7 Veteran Combat Call Center1-877-WAR-VETS (1-877-927-8387) to talk to another combat Veteran.DoD’s Defense Centers of Excellence (DCoE) 24/7 Outreach Center for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury provides information and helps locate resources.

Call 1-866-966-1020 or email resources@dcoeoutreach.orgMilitary OneSourceCall 24/7 for counseling and many resources 1-800-342-9647.Need further assistance? Get Help with VA PTSD Care

 

Afghan War Child

Please do not forget the children.

The McGlynn

Comments are closed.

© 2020 themcglynn.com | Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS)

Global Positioning System Gazettewordpress logo