themcglynn.com

26 Nov

United States Wars, News and Casualties

United States Wars, News and Casualties

Damn The War Criminals,Bush,Cheney,Rice,Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz, Powell and Blair from England.

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The war ended for those children, but it has never ended for survivors who carry memories of them. Likewise, the effects of the U.S. bombings continue, immeasurably and indefensibly.

How many Iraqis have died as a result of the invasion 15 years ago? Some credible estimates put the number at more than one million. You can read that sentence again.

The invasion of Iraq is often spoken of in our country as a “blunder,” or even a “colossal mistake.” It was a crime.

Those who perpetrated it are still at large. Some of them have even been rehabilitated thanks to the horrors of a mostly amnesiac citizenry.

We condemned children to death, some after many days of writhing in pain on bloodstained mats, without pain relievers. Some died quickly, wasted by missing arms and legs, crushed heads. As the fluids ran out of their bodies, they appeared like withered, spoiled fruits. They could have lived, certainly should have lived – and laughed and danced, and run and played- but instead they were brutally murdered. Yes, murdered!

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The McGlynn

War News

Photos

Iraq War Children

Pictures by Corporal MIKE PRYSNER, US Military Iraq War Veteran

NYT: Suspected US Drone Strike Kills 6 Al-Qaida Fighters in Yemen

SANAA, Yemen — Yemeni tribal leaders say a suspected U.S. drone strike killed six alleged al-Qaida militants in the country’s southwest.

The tribal leaders say an unmanned aircraft targeted an al-Qaida hideout in al-Qrishia district in Bayda province on Sunday, killing two commanders and four other militants.

The tribal leaders spoke on condition of anonymity, fearing for their own safety.

Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, as the Yemeni group is known, has long been considered the network’s most dangerous branch and has attempted to carry out attacks on the U.S. mainland.

Yemen was plunged into civil war more than three years ago. Since March 2015, a Saudi-led coalition has been battling Yemen’s Shiite rebels, known as Houthis.

NYT: Charities to US: Halt Support for Saudi Coalition in Yemen

CAIRO — Five international charities on Monday urged the United States to halt all military support for a Saudi-led coalition fighting Yemen’s Shiite rebels, saying this will save millions of lives.

A joint statement by the International Rescue Committee, Oxfam America, CARE US, Save the Children, and the Norwegian Refugee Council said that 14 million people are at risk of starving to death in Yemen if the parties to the conflict don’t change course immediately.

The warring sides have undermined Yemen’s economy with policies and practices that have caused rampant inflation while the value of currency plummets, it added.

“Starvation must not be used as a weapon of war against Yemeni civilians,” the statement said.

The charities called the U.S. to back up its recent call for a cessation of hostilities in Yemen with genuine diplomatic pressure, mainly Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

A survey commissioned by one of the charities, the International Rescue Committee or IRC, found that 75 percent of Americans surveyed oppose U.S. weapons sales to Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

The YouGov survey also showed that at 82 percent of respondents believe Congress should vote to end or decrease arms sales to the two Gulf Arab countries.

David Miliband, president of the IRC, said America is “fueling a crisis that has severe consequences for millions of civilians.”

YouGov surveyed 1,168 respondents online from Nov. 7 until Nov. 9. The poll had a margin of error of 3.3 percent, IRC said.

International outrage over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi by Saudi agents in October in Turkey has also focused attention on Yemen’s civil war, prompting the U.S. to scale back its support for the coalition and call for a cease-fire by the end of this month.

In March 2015, the U.S.-backed, Saudi-led coalition unleased a full-scale military campaign against Iran-allied Houthi rebels who had captured most of Yemen including the capital, Sanaa, a few months earlier.

Tens of thousands of people are believed to have been killed in the war, and two-thirds of Yemen’s 27 million people rely on aid. More than 8 million are at risk of starvation in what has become the world’s worst humanitarian disaster.

If it doesn’t cease its military support for the coalition, “the United States, too, will bear responsibility for what may be the largest famine in decades,” the charities said.

NYT: U.S.-Backed Syria Forces Clash With Islamic State, Dozens Dead: Monitor, SANA

BEIRUT — Heavy clashes between Islamic State militants and U.S.-backed forces in eastern Syria killed dozens of civilians and fighters in the past two days, a monitoring group said.

With the help of U.S. jets and special forces, the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) alliance is battling the remnants of Islamic State in an enclave near the Iraqi border.

The SDF restored positions it had lost to attacks in recent days, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. Battles raged on the eastern bank of the Euphrates river on Sunday.

“The SDF did regain back a lot of territory lost the other day,” Colonel Sean Ryan, spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition, told Reuters. “Both sides took casualties.”

Iraqi security forces are securing the border so no fighters can escape, he added.

The SDF, which the Kurdish YPG militia leads, has seized vast territory from the jihadists across northern and eastern Syria, where some 2,000 U.S. troops are stationed.

SDF officials were not immediately available for comment.

Islamic State’s self-proclaimed caliphate has crumbled after different offensives in Iraq and Syria, but its fighters still operate in the desert border region and mount attacks.

Syrian state news agency SANA said coalition warplanes killed 14 people “in a new massacre” in al-Shaafa village. Air strikes had killed 20 other people, including nine children, in the nearby town of Hajin, it said a day earlier.

The U.S.-led coalition says it seeks to avoid civilian casualties and investigates any allegations. Colonel Ryan said on Saturday that strikes were limited and had not affected civilians.

The UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights put the death toll at 31 civilians in the past two days, as well as 50 Islamic State and 79 SDF combatants.

Islamic State released a graphic video overnight showing its militants beheading a hostage and threatening the families of SDF fighters.

Its media outlet Amaq on Saturday said the jihadists staged attacks on two fronts, killing dozens of Kurdish milita fighters and taking 30 others hostage.

Separately, in the northwest, more than 100 people were wounded in a suspected toxic gas attack in Aleppo city, which Damascus and Moscow blamed on rebel factions.

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REU: At least 22 Afghan police killed in Taliban ambush, officials say

HERAT, Afghanistan (Reuters) – At least 22 police were killed in a Taliban ambush in Afghanistan’s western province of Farah late on Sunday, officials said, adding to the growing casualty toll on Afghan security forces fighting an increasingly confident insurgency.

Taliban fighters ambushed a security forces’ convoy in Lash-e Joveyn district of Farah, a remote and sparsely populated province on the border with Iran where the Taliban have control of large parts of the countryside.

Police spokesman Mohebullah Moheb confirmed the ambush but gave no details. A spokesman at the provincial hospital said 22 bodies had been brought in from the incident.

Taliban spokesman Qari Yousuf Ahmadi said 25 police, including senior commanders, had been killed and four vehicles were destroyed in the attack. Large quantities of weapons were captured, he said.

Afghan authorities no longer release detailed figures but U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis recently confirmed casualties have been running at some 500 a month, a figure many officials in Kabul say understates the real toll.

The losses have been mounting even while U.S. diplomatic efforts to begin peace talks with the Taliban have picked up with the appointment by Washington of Zalmay Khalilzad, a former U.S. ambassador to Kabul, as special peace envoy.

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