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10 Jun

Testimonies of Occupation

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Gaza Families Down to a Meal a Day

By Erin Cunningham

Full Article

Um Abdullah cannot remember the last time she was able to feed meat to her eight children. She does know that for the past week the single meal she cooked for them each day consisted only of lentils. And that on one day, she had received aid coupons from the United Nations, which she subsequently sold to buy tomatoes and eggplant at the local market.

Um Abdullah is a 42-year-old dressmaker and hails from Jabaliya, a cramped refugee camp on the outskirts of Gaza City. Stories like hers are commonplace across the Gaza Strip, where years of sanctions, siege and now war have battered the territory’s economy and put many essentials out of reach for the majority of the population.

“We live day to day, nothing more,” says Um Abdullah, who made less than three dollars in profit over the last three days. “If we can eat once a day, that is good enough for us.”

While the prices of food and other goods have cooled off from the record highs they hit during Israel’s three-week assault, the World Food Programme (WFP) reports that a number of items, many of them basic, remain more expensive for Gaza’s residents than they were before Operation Cast Lead.

Sugar, rice, onion, cucumber, tomato, lemon, pepper, chicken, meat, fish and garlic were all more expensive for Gaza’s residents in March 2009 than they were in December 2008, the WFP says.

The price of pepper per kilogram doubled, while the cost of onions jumped 33 percent. Fresh chicken is now 43 percent more expensive than before the war, a result of the destruction of a number of poultry farms across Gaza throughout the assault.

The decimation of wide swathes of agricultural land, as well as cattle and sheep farms, has added to Gaza’s growing food insecurity.

But the war only intensified an already dire humanitarian situation, economists say, which has its roots in Israel’s economic siege that hermetically sealed Gaza’s borders in June 2007……………………………….

“At the beginning of the siege, it was only the poor that stopped buying fruit,” Al-Masari says. “Now, nobody buys fruit. Life has become increasingly worse.”

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