themcglynn.com

12 May

News and Analyses, A Foreign Perspective

English Online International Newspapers

For a change from the same old news stories from the same old news networks, here are links to English-edition online newspapers from other parts of the world. Nearly all of these are English-edition daily newspapers. These sites have interesting editorials and essays, and many have links to other good news sources. We try to limit this list to those sites which are regularly updated, reliable, with a high percentage of “up” time.

Some of the available newspapers:

Asia & CIS

www.newscentralasia.com/

China

english.peopledaily.com.cn/home.html

China & Hong Kong

www.scmp.com/news

France

www.france24.com/en/france/

Israel

www.haaretz.com/

Norway

www.newsinenglish.no/category/news/

Palestine

english.pnn.ps/

Russia

english.pravda.ru/

Ukraine

www.ukrainianjournal.com/

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Move throws case against Khalid Sheikh Mohammed into chaos as defense team says ‘fatally flawed’ Guantánamo military tribunal should be ended

A courtroom sketch of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, whose defense team said it received a sealed order in February that the judge had permitted the government to destroy evidence.

A courtroom sketch of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, whose defense team said it received a sealed order in February that the judge had permitted the government to destroy evidence. Photograph: Janet Hamlin/AP

An explosive allegation about destroyed evidence threatens to unravel the already shaky military tribunal for the alleged architect of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Attorneys for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed are calling on the judge and the entire prosecution team in Mohammed’s military commission at Guantánamo Bay to step down from the long-running case over what a member of the defense team called “at least the appearance of collusion” that led to the government apparently secretly destroying information relevant to the premier post-9/11 tribunal.

The defense team further argues that the destruction of evidence ought to spell the end of Mohammed’s military trial entirely, a development that would leave the Obama administration and its successor to come up with an entirely new plan for what to do with the top terror suspect in US custody.

“Now, and indeed over other matters previously, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s military commission is fatally flawed,” said David Nevin, Mohammed’s lead attorney.

The prosecution in the 9/11 military tribunal is seeking the death penalty for the self-described architect of the attacks, who has been in US custody for more than 12 years.

The details of what happened are not known because the unclassified legal filing is not yet publicly available. The specific allegations were filed yesterday before the commission, but the filing must clear a routine security review that all such legal documents before the commission undergo…………..

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Alvin Hellerstein, who presided over 12-year lawsuit to disclose military images of detainee abuse, may force further release of photographs in ‘near future’

us military torture

A composite showing some of the torture images from US military, among 198 photographs released in February. Photograph: Department of Defense

A federal judge has sharply rebuked the Pentagon for the process by which it concealed hundreds of Bush-era photos showing US military personnel torturing detainees in Iraq and Afghanistan, suggesting Barack Obama may have to release even more graphic imagery of abuse.

Alvin Hellerstein, the senior judge who has presided over a transparency lawsuit for the photos that has lasted more than 12 years, expressed dissatisfaction over the Pentagon’s compliance with an order he issued last year requiring a case-by-case ruling that release of an estimated 1,800 photographs would endanger US troops.

“We don’t know the methodology, we don’t know what was reviewed, we don’t know the criteria, we don’t know the numbers,” Hellerstein said during an hour-long hearing on Wednesday.

Hellerstein said he would formally rule on the matter in the “near future”, a process that may compel the Pentagon to disclose additional photographs.

Tara LaMort, a justice department attorney, argued to Hellerstein that a multi-layered review of the photographs, conducted by the military officers on the Pentagon’s joint staff, had determined that disclosing the vast majority of the photographic treasure trove would provide terrorist groups with propaganda useful for recruitment………

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Outdoor pollution has risen 8% in five years with fast-growing cities in the developing world worst affected, WHO data shows

Outdoor air pollution has grown 8% globally in the past five years, with billions of people around the world now exposed to dangerous air, according to new data from more than 3,000 cities compiled by the World Health Organisation. Director Maira Neira says India and China need to make ‘massive efforts because the situation at the moment is really bad for the population’

Outdoor air pollution has grown 8% globally in the past five years, with billions of people around the world now exposed to dangerous air, according to new data from more than 3,000 cities compiled by the World Health Organisation (WHO).

While all regions are affected, fast-growing cities in the Middle East, south-east Asia and the western Pacific are the most impacted with many showing pollution levels at five to 10 times above WHO recommended levels.

According to the new WHO database, levels of ultra-fine particles of less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5s) are highest in India, which has 16 of the world’s 30 most polluted cities.

China, which has been plagued by air pollution, has improved its air quality since 2011 and now has only five cities in the top 30. Nine other countries, including Pakistan and Iran, have one city each in the worst 30…………..

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What are the top 10 most secretive tax havens?

, and ,

A world-class tax haven needs several key ingredients: a highly secretive banking system; a stable government that is happy to look the other way; and of course ultra-low taxes. So as David Cameron gathers world leaders for a major anti-corruption summit in London, we look at the top 10 most secretive tax havens

Data source: The Tax Justice Network Financial Secrecy Index

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Helicopter video shows driver stepping slowly out of his truck and putting his hands on the ground before several officers start pummeling him

Helicopter video of the end of a high-speed police pursuit from Massachusetts to New Hampshire shows a driver stepping slowly out of his truck, kneeling and putting his hands on the ground before several officers rush him and start pummeling him

Helicopter video of the end of a high-speed police pursuit from Massachusetts to New Hampshire shows a driver stepping slowly out of his truck, kneeling and putting his hands on the ground before several officers rush him and start pummeling him

Helicopter video of the end of a high-speed police pursuit from Massachusetts to New Hampshire shows a driver stepping slowly out of his truck, kneeling and putting his hands on the ground before several officers rush him and start pummeling him.

The driver was taken into custody by local police on Wednesday, but Massachusetts state police, who were involved in the pursuit, said they’ll review whether the force used was appropriate.

The chase started Wednesday afternoon when Richard Simone, of Worcester, Massachusetts, refused to stop for local police in Holden, said Massachusetts state police. Simone was wanted on multiple warrants for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, larceny and failure to stop for police, they said………

US politics

Election 2016

Sanders’ end game Keep the message alive even as nomination slips away

Democrats unveil their secret general election weapon: Donald Trump

Trump loses another delegate as anti-Muslim pastor ‘takes one for the team’

Join, or die: Paul Ryan signals desire to put party unity ahead of Trump anxiety

Peace in our time? Trump and Ryan make nice

Campaign live Trump says proposed ban on Muslims was ‘only a suggestion’

Opinion Paul Ryan: creep, failure, hero of the hour

Mitt Romney It is ‘disqualifying’ that Trump won’t release tax returns

Reality check Are Trump’s odds of winning the US election really so slim?

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Opinion

No victims have been compensated for what they suffered, and this remains a stain on the US justice system. An appeal on 12 May could change that

The sun rises on the Abu Ghraib prison on the outskirts of Baghdad, Iraq Tuesday, June 22, 2004. On Monday a judge declared the notorious prison a crime scene and forbade its destruction, as had been previously offered by President Bush.(AP Photo/John Moore)

‘A trial would decide whether the victims obtain compensation for their injuries and, no less important, a measure of respect from the hands of American justice.’ Photograph: John Moore/AP

Twelve years ago American citizens and the rest of the world were rocked by the graphic photographs of the sexual and physical torture at Abu Ghraib. Once seen, the images are impossible to forget: the terrified prisoners, wide-eyed, mostly naked; the pyramids of bodies; the dog-collared man on all fours led on a leash; the hooded man standing on a box, arms spread as if crucified, electrical wires dangling from his fingertips. And, in almost every picture, the guards, looking on with a smirk.

As general counsel to the navy at that time, and an opponent of the Bush administration’s use and rationalization of torture and inhumane treatment against detainees, I watched Dick Cheney, George Tenet and others look on the laws that make torture unlawful with that same smirk. GOP frontrunner Donald Trump and Senator Ted Cruz, two torture proponents, follow in that tradition.

Do we want our American courts to uphold this lawlessness? To join the torturers and their enablers in smirking at the victims? So far, our courts have acted in just this way, barring torture victims from pursuing civil claims.

We are about to find out if our courts will continue this injustice. On 12 May, the fourth circuit court of appeals in Richmond, Virginia, will hear oral argument in Al Shimari v CACI, an appeal from a civil case brought by the Center for Constitutional Rights on behalf of Abu Ghraib victims against a US-based government contractor.

The outcome of the appeal will determine whether the case will be heard or dismissed without trial. And a trial would decide whether the victims obtain compensation for their injuries and, no less important, a measure of respect from the hands of American justice.

If they do, it would be a first. Most of the torture claimants (and none in the Abu Ghraib case) have never been charged with involvement with insurgent activity, much less terrorism. But despite this, and the US’s treaty obligation to provide compensation to victims of torture, none have obtained a verdict since 9/11. Indeed, no victim has even gotten a trial……..

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