themcglynn.com

17 Apr

News and Analyses, A Foreign Perspective

English Online International Newspapers

For a change from the same old news stories from the same old news networks, here are links to English-edition online newspapers from other parts of the world. Nearly all of these are English-edition daily newspapers, with an emphasis on the Middle East and Asia. These sites have interesting editorials and essays, and many have links to other good news sources. We try to limit this list to those sites which are regularly updated, reliable, with a high percentage of “up” time.

Some of the available newspapers:

Asia & CIS

www.newscentralasia.com/

China

english.peopledaily.com.cn/home.html

China & Hong Kong

www.scmp.com/news

France

www.france24.com/en/france/

Israel

www.haaretz.com/

Norway

www.newsinenglish.no/category/news/

Palestine

english.pnn.ps/

Russia

english.pravda.ru/

Ukraine

www.ukrainianjournal.com/

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Refugee families taken to Vatican express gratitude to pontiff for his ‘gesture of hope’ in rescuing them from Lesbos

Pope Francis visits the Moria refugee camp in Lesbos

Pope Francis visits the Moria refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos on Saturday. Photograph: Paul Haring/CPP/Rex/Shutterstock

The Syrian refugees Pope Francis took in following his visit to the Greek island of Lesbos have hailed the pontiff as a saviour for offering them a new life.

In a hugely symbolic move seen as a lesson in solidarity for Europe, Francis, who is the son of Italian migrants to Argentina, took 12 Syrians from three families – all of them Muslims – home with him to the Vatican on Saturday.

“All refugees are children of God,” the 79-year-old pontiff said on the flight back to Rome, adding that though his gesture was “a drop in the ocean” he hoped “the ocean will never be the same again”.

In an interview with the Italian daily newspaper La Stampa, the families, who spent their first night in Rome at a Catholic charity, expressed their gratitude for the pope’s “gesture of hope”.

“We saw friends and relatives die in the rubble, we fled Syria because we no longer had any hope,” said Hasan, an engineer from Damascus, who arrived in Italy with his wife, Nour, and two-year-old son.

After fleeing to Turkey, he and his family set out for Europein a rubber dinghy that sailed from the Turkish coast to Greece. “But it was overloaded,” he said, recalling the pitch black of the sea at night and the waves rocking the vessel………………

More on this story:

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Bernie Sanders: Pope Francis is a ‘beautiful man’ – video

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders says he feels honoured to have met Pope Francis at the Vatican on Saturday morning. Sanders tells reporters he was granted a five minute meeting where he expressed his admiration for the pontiff, praising his stance on social justice and his call for injecting morality into the global economy

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NSA whistleblower responds to admission by Australian federal police that it investigated leaks to a Guardian journalist by requesting his metadata

Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden: ‘Police in developed democracies don’t pore over journalists’ private activities to hunt down confidential sources.’ Photograph: Alan Rusbridger for the Guardian

Edward Snowden has condemned Australian law enforcement for collecting the communications records of a Guardian journalist without a warrant.

The world’s most prominent whistleblower, who disclosed dragnet surveillance unprecedented in its scale by the National Security Agency and its allies, singled out for critique the Australian government’s contention that it broke no laws in its leak investigation of Paul Farrell, a Guardian reporter who in 2014 exposed the inner workings of Australia’s maritime interception of asylum seekers.

“Police in developed democracies don’t pore over journalists’ private activities to hunt down confidential sources,” Snowden told the Guardian.

“The Australian federal police are defending such operations as perfectly legal, but that’s really the problem, isn’t it? Sometimes the scandal is not what law was broken, but what the law allows.”

Throughout 2015 the Australian parliament enacted a series of controversial laws that curbed privacy and freedom of expression rights.

Geoffrey King, director of the Committee to Protect Journalists’ Technology Program, said the AFP’s actions were “obviously outrageous”.

“This should not be happening. But it is the inevitable result of mandatory data retention and mass surveillance, which is neither necessary nor proportional to any threat,” King said. “It doesn’t line up with the values that we all adhere to, to good counter terrorism strategy, and it certainly doesn’t line up with a free and open society where journalists can do their jobs.”…………

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US politics

Election 2016

On the faultline: New York fracking ban leaves state divided as primary looms

Campaign live Sanders, Trump and Clinton flock to New York

 

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