themcglynn.com

19 Jan

News and Analyses, A Foreign Perspective

tg

US politics >>

At least 14 UK events planned for Saturday in solidarity with march in Washington after Trump’s inauguration

Women prepare signs to hold at the march in Washington DC.

Women prepare signs to hold at the march in Washington DC. Photograph: Boston Globe via Getty Images

Donald Trump will be inaugurated as president of the United States on Friday and women are preparing to take to the streets of Washington and cities across the globe on Saturday 21 January.

In the UK at least 14 marches, demonstrations and gatherings are planned. In London, tens of thousands of people are planning to turn out in solidarity, and sister demonstrations are also being held in Bangor, Barnstaple, Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Shipley, Southampton, St Austell and York.

London

When and where

Saturday 21 January at midday at the US embassy: 24 Grosvenor Square, W1A 2LQ

Schedule

12pm Marchers are planning to assemble in front of the embassy, before making their way to Trafalgar Square for a 90-minute rally from 2pm. The map below shows the planned route:

What to wear

Organisers have asked marchers to wear comfortable shoes and waterproof clothing in case of rain. The march is 1.2 miles long. It is set to be cloudy on Saturday – but likely to be cold.

Check the website for last-minute changes and updates

Toilet facilities will not be provided by the march organisers. The map of its route identifies some public toilets. This map provides more details. Organisers stress that the march is intended to be peaceful, and ask people to “come with an open mind and an open heart”.

Transport and logistics

London’s transport authority TfL provides a guide to step-free stations and a tool for route planning. March organisers have also provided a logistics pack.

Children and families

The march is open to all ages and a children’s area beside the embassy building will be set up where young marchers will be able to get their faces painted, as well as other activities.

Disabled people

North Audley Street is earmarked for those with access needs. Stewards holding green placards will offer help at the corner of North Audley Street and Grosvenor Square. Organisers say: “People with access needs may wish to join the green group, who will be marching directly behind the frontline. BSL interpreters will be marching in the green group.” They will also interpret speeches both at the embassy and at Trafalgar Square.

First aiders will be present. For questions related to access on the day, call 07572 650 733.

Shorter route

People who would rather take a shorter route can join the march where Pall Mall meets Waterloo Place. There will be step-free access to Trafalgar Square with a clear pathway, monitored by stewards. Police have advised people to use the east side of the square for car and taxi drop-off and pick-up. Electric wheelchair users will be able to recharge in the National Gallery.

Read Full Article>>

Letters to Obama: farewell to the hope and change president>>

Barack Obama on how Malia and Sasha reacted to Trump’s victory – video>>

Barack Obama: ‘justice served’ by Chelsea Manning commutation>>

Obama defends decision to commute Chelsea Manning’s sentence – video>>

Barack Obama’s final press conference pep talk: ‘I think we’re going to be OK’>>

Elizabeth Warren: Trump’s treasury secretary pick ‘grinds families into the dirt’>>

Trump inauguration: Taiwan delegation could ‘disturb Sino-US relations’>>

All Nafta measures ‘put on the table’ under Trump, says commerce nominee>>

Nikki Haley opposes Trump’s views on Russia at confirmation hearing>>

Trump EPA pick: still ‘some debate’ over human role in climate change>>

Deplorables Inaugural Ball celebrates peaceful, ‘sexy’ transfer of power – video>>

Indiana bill would allow police to shut down protests ‘by any means necessary’>>

Wilbur Ross confirmation hearing for commerce secretary: the key points>>

 

untitled

The US government has continually mined the bank for some of its top posts despite its role in the 2008 financial crisis – and protests are popping up across the country again in response to Donald Trump’s cabinet picks

goldman sachs protester

‘It’s about highlighting the lie that was told to millions of people in this country, the lie that Trump was draining the swamp.’ Photograph: Pacific Press/Rex/Shutterstock

In a persistent drizzle on 17 January, a group of protesters swathed in green ponchos unfurled tarps and sleeping bags on the sidewalk in front of Goldman Sachs’ high-rise building on the West Side highway in New York City. A few of them wore handmade swamp creature masks; others bore signs with the swamp creatures on them. A light-board sign declared the bank “Government Sachs”.

The protest was the beginning of a multi-day camp-out aiming to stay on the sidewalk outside the investment bank until the inauguration of Donald Trump, and to bring people affected by the bank’s policies to the doorstep of some of the world’s richest people – some of whom will belong to the Trump administration.

“It’s about highlighting the lie that was told to millions of people in this country, the lie that Trump was draining the swamp. If we really want the swamp to be drained, we have to do it ourselves and we’re doing it by going to Goldman Sachs,” says Nelini Stamp of the Working Families party.

Steven Mnuchin was called Mr Foreclosure. Do you want Mr Foreclosure to be secretary of the treasury?

As the crowd of about 100 people set up camp, the police erected barricades around them but mostly held off as the crowd moved from chanting “The swamp is getting deeper! The swamp is Goldman Sachs!” to a series of speak-outs from the crowd about the bank’s connection to payday lending, the economic crisis in Puerto Rico, foreclosures and more.

For Jean Sassine, who lost his job and nearly lost his home during the 2008 financial crisis, fighting the influence of the big banks in Washington is personal. He became a member of community organization New York Communities for Change (NYCC) six years ago as a way to fight back, and for him the Goldman action “means trying to wake people up that these are the people who were part of the big crisis in 2008, that Steven Mnuchin was called Mr Foreclosure at OneWest and Goldman Sachs. Do you want Mr Foreclosure to be secretary of the treasury?”

The organizers targeted Goldman Sachs because, as Stamp explains, the bank “is a pipeline to government”. Through Democratic and Republican administrations, she notes, Goldman Sachs in particular has fed its bankers into high-ranking government positions – if Mnuchin is confirmed as treasury secretary, Trump will be the third of the past four presidents to have hired for that job from Goldman’s ranks. To Stamp, particularly in the post-financial crisis era, this means the bank is being rewarded for its involvement in subprime mortgages and the financial instruments created to profit from them.

A two-minute guide to President-elect Donald Trump’s proposed cabinet. Already the richest in modern history, his picks include an array of the super wealthy, big business executives and climate change deniers

On that front, says Renata Pumerol of NYCC, it is important to confront the power brokers directly as well as the elected officials who work with them. Calling them “Government Sachs” is a way to highlight the level to which they have captured Washington and influence policy that

Read Full Article>>

untitled

With climate sceptics moving into the White House, the Guardian is spending 24 hours focusing on climate change – and what we can all do to help save the planet


HOUR FOUR: Europe, from peak to coast. Plus the climate change symphony

So Europe might not be on the frontline of climate change but it’s already feeling the depradations of flooding, drought, and rising sea levels.

Over the past hour we’ve reported on:

In Italy, questions as to whether climate change might transform wine making.

Insurers reporting a sharp increase in weather-related payouts.

And we are still trying to draw climate change.

HOUR FOUR: Europe, from peak to coast. Plus the climate change symphony

So Europe might not be on the frontline of climate change but it’s already feeling the depradations of flooding, drought, and rising sea levels.

Over the past hour we’ve reported on:

In Italy, questions as to whether climate change might transform wine making.

Insurers reporting a sharp increase in weather-related payouts.

And we are still trying to draw climate change.

10:57

 

Of course, different parts of Europe face different challenges.

In Spain, Sam Jones reports that some forecasters believe that southern Spain will be reduced to desert by 2100 if the current rate of greenhouse gas emissions continue unchecked.

Researchers looked at the consequences for vegetation in the Mediterranean basin under a variety of possible temperature rises. In the worst case scenario – which would see global temperatures rising by nearly 5C by the end of the century – deserts would expand northwards across southern Spain and Sicily, and deciduous forests would be replaced by Mediterranean vegetation. Roughly a third of Spain would find itself as arid by then as the Tabernas desert in Almería is today.

As one ecologist has pointed out, a rise of nearly 5C would be “like bringing Casablanca to Madrid”.

This warming has implications for the Alps too. The Guardian’s Stephanie Kirchgaessner, says that in the Italian resort of Obereggen, sometimes it has not been cold enough to give the town much time to crank up its snow production.

Resident Thomas Ondertoller told her:

Last year we had one week to make the snow. We use a lot of water, and a lot of technical expertise, to make as much snow as possible, because usually after that there is a warm period.

For the passionate skier, the product is perfect. For the romantic skier, something is missing,” he says.

Further north, it is the sea, not the snow that is the problem, Jennifer Rankin reports from Belgium.

Authorities in Flanders, guardians of Belgium’s 73km strip of coastline, are spending €8m (£6.9m) to investigate whether they can build an island to keep the rising tide at bay. The newest bit of Belgium would be off the coast of Knokke, the genteel resort best known for its picturesque dunes and posh golf course. Under an early plan, the island would be 40 hectares big, but could be made 10 times larger over time.

Read Full Article>>

untitled

all

Comments are closed.

© 2021 themcglynn.com | Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS)

Global Positioning System Gazettewordpress logo