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19 Aug

Martin O’Malley – For President?

*The O’Leary: How about O’Malley instead of Clinton?

Wikipedia

Martin O’Malley
O'Malley-Portrait-2013.jpg
61st Governor of Maryland

Governor of Maryland

Elections

Main articles: Maryland gubernatorial election, 2006 and Maryland gubernatorial election, 2010

O’Malley considered a run for governor in 2002, but decided not to run; in October 2005, after much speculation, O’Malley officially announced he would run in 2006.[34] He had one primary opponent, Montgomery County Executive Doug Duncan. In June 2006, Duncan abruptly dropped out a few days after being diagnosed with clinical depression, and endorsed O’Malley.[35] O’Malley was thus nominated by the Democratic Party, unopposed on the primary ballot, to challenge incumbent Bob Ehrlich in the November 2006 election. O’Malley selected Delegate Anthony G. Brown as his running mate.[36]

The Baltimore Sun endorsed O’Malley, saying: “When he was first elected mayor in 1999, the former two-term city councilman inherited a city of rising crime, failing schools, and shrinking economic prospects. He was able to reverse course in all of these areas.”[37] The Washington Post criticized O’Malley for “not solv[ing] the problems of rampant crime and rough schools in Baltimore, but he put a dent in them,” and also criticized him for being too focused on Baltimore, offering “little of substance” on Washington-area issues.[38] The Times tied O’Malley to the swing of the Maryland General Assembly to the far left.[39] O’Malley led by margins of several points in most polls during the campaign, but polls tightened significantly in the last week of the campaign. O’Malley ultimately defeated Ehrlich 53%–46% in the November 7, 2006, general election.[40]

In 2010, O’Malley announced his intention to run for re-election, while Ehrlich announced he would also run, setting up a rematch of 2006. Despite major losses for Democrats nationwide, O’Malley defeated Ehrlich 56%–42%, receiving just over one million votes.[41] Due to term limits, O’Malley is unable to run for re-election in 2014.

First term

Martin O’Malley’s inauguration

Budget

Governor O’Malley called a special session of the General Assembly November 2007 to close a projected budget deficit of $1.7 billion for 2008–2009.[42] In response, O’Malley and other lawmakers passed a tax plan would raise total state tax collections by 14%.[43] In April 2009, O’Malley signed a traffic speed camera enforcement law, a bill which he supported and fought for in order to help raise revenue to try to balance the deficit facing Maryland. Through strong lobbying by O’Malley, the bill was revived after first having been defeated. After a second vote, the measure passed.[44]

Democratic Party

O’Malley was elected as the Vice Chairman of the Democratic Governors Association for 2009–2010, and on December 1, 2010, he was elected Chairman for 2010–2011.[45]

Crime

Soon after entering office, O’Malley closed the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, a notoriously violent maximum-security prison facility.[46]

Since taking office O’Malley has adapted the CitiStat program he devised for Baltimore and applied it to the state of Maryland. This new program is called StateStat. O’Malley has said that President Obama has looked at StateStat as a potential model for tracking stimulus funding.[47]

Second term[edit]

Immigration

In a debate during the 2010 campaign, O’Malley referred to undocumented immigrants as “new Americans”, as he endorsed tougher enforcement against illegal immigration by the federal government.[48] In May 2011, O’Malley signed a law that would make the children of undocumented immigrants eligible for in-state college tuition under certain conditions.[49] The law provides that undocumented immigrants can be eligible for in-state tuition if students have attended a high school in Maryland for three years and if they or their parents have paid state income taxes during that time.[2] In response, Delegate Neil Parrott created an online petition to suspend the law pending a referendum vote that would be held during the 2012 general election.[50] On November 6, 2012, a majority of state voters passed referendum Question 4 by 58%.[51]

During the 2014 crisis of undocumented children from central America crossing the border, O’Malley refused to open a facility in Westminster, Maryland to house the children. The White House criticized his decision as hypocritical given comments he made indicating that he thought deporting all the children was wrong. He then responded saying the White House mischaracterized his remarks. [52]

Same-sex marriage

Further information: Same-sex marriage in Maryland

O’Malley voiced his support for a bill considered by the General Assembly to legalize same-sex marriage in Maryland. O’Malley, a Catholic, was urged by the Archbishop of Baltimore Edwin O’Brien not to support the bill in a private letter sent two days before O’Malley voiced his support.[53] “I am well aware that the recent events in New York have intensified pressure on you to lend your active support to legislation to redefine marriage,” O’Brien wrote. “As advocates for the truths we are compelled to uphold, we speak with equal intensity and urgency in opposition to your promoting a goal that so deeply conflicts with your faith, not to mention the best interests of our society.”[53] O’Malley responded, “I do not presume, nor would I ever presume as Governor, to question or infringe upon your freedom to define, to preach about, and to administer the sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church. But on the public issue of granting equal civil marital rights to same-sex couples, you and I disagree.”[53]

The Maryland House of Delegates approved the bill by a 72–67 vote on February 17,[54] and the Maryland Senate approved the bill by a vote of 25–22 on February 23.[55] The bill was amended to take effect on January 1, 2013, allowing for a voter referendum.[56] O’Malley signed the bill on March 1, 2012.[57] After signature, referendum petitioners gathered the support required to challenge the law.[58] Referendum Question 6 was passed by 52.4% of the state’s voters on November 6, 2012.[59][60]

Capital punishment

O’Malley, a long-time opponent of capital punishment,[61] signed a bill on May 2, 2013, that repealed the death penalty in Maryland for all future offenders.[62] The repeal does not affect the five inmates currently on death row in Maryland and O’Malley has said that he will consider commuting their sentences to life imprisonment with no possibility of parole on a case-by-case basis.[63]

Future political ambitions[edit]

After O’Malley stood in for 2008 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a Democratic campaign event on June 2, 2007, in New Hampshire, Delegate Tony O’Donnell said in response, “It’s the worst-kept secret in Maryland that the governor has national ambitions.”[64] State Senator Thomas V. Miller, Jr. said O’Malley’s political future “comes into play in everything he does”, adding O’Malley is “very much like Bill Clinton in being slow and deliberative and calculating in everything he does.”[64]

Speculation about O’Malley’s plans was further fueled by his high profile at the 2012 Democratic National Convention, where he received a primetime speaking slot on the second night of the convention and spoke to delegations from several states, including Iowa, where the first presidential caucuses are held in election years, and Ohio, a key swing state in recent presidential elections.[65] O’Malley’s prominence at the convention generated both support, and criticism of his record. U.S. Senator Ben Cardin and Howard County Executive Ken Ulman praised his speech, with Ulman saying, “To borrow a catchphrase from his address, his career is moving forward, not back.”[65]

O’Malley has publicly expressed interest in a presidential run in 2016 on multiple occasions. At a press conference in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, at a National Governors Association meeting in August 2013, O’Malley stated he was laying “the framework” for a presidential run.[66][67][68][69]

Electoral history

Mayor of Baltimore

Baltimore City Democratic mayoral primary, 1999[74]

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±%

 

Democratic

Martin O’Malley

62,711

53.2

+25.5

 

Democratic

Carl Stokes

32,609

27.7

?25.5

 

Democratic

Lawrence Bell

20,034

17.0

?36.2

 

Democratic

Other

2,444

2.1

N/A

Baltimore City mayoral general election, 1999[74]

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±%

 

Democratic

Martin O’Malley

87,607

90.5

+81

 

Republican

David F. Tufaro

9,207

9.5

?81

Governor of Maryland

Maryland gubernatorial election, 2006[40]

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±%

Democratic

Martin O’Malley

942,279

52.7

+5.0

Republican

Robert Ehrlich (incumbent)

825,464

46.2

?5.4

Maryland gubernatorial election, 2010[75]

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

±%

 

Democratic

Martin O’Malley (incumbent)

1,044,961

56.2

+3.5

 

Republican

Robert Ehrlich

776,319

41.8

?4.4

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